Welcome to the weblog of the writers and artists of Ferret Press (a publisher of fine comix) and PANEL (a Columbus, Ohio comic creators collaborative.) Here you will find our musings on comics, art, the creative process, politics, the web, and life.

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Friday, March 30, 2007
 
  Posted by Tom on 3/30/2007 09:45:00 PM :

      

Jesse Hamm is a golden god. With a great piece on scripting for artists. Some of the scenarios are eerie. Things that would drive me up a wall in a script. A suggestion that was brought up when writing is to thumbnail out a script before hitting the keys. Great suggestion, as it helps with pacing a story. And can avoid some akward results. Funny samples abound in the piece of scripts gone wrong. The big part is lobbying a level of trust with the artist on visual cues. Or in one script I had where the writer gave one too many possibilities in the panel. I like to avoid situations where I get paranoid about stepping on the writer's ego by doing something different. Because if I did stick to the script the page wouldn't flow at all.

Granted not every script is perfect. I've been lucky that every writer I've worked with has been open to suggestions or allow me to run with it. I thank every writer that's put up with my shenanigans so far. Hope this helps some struggling scripters.


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  Posted by Dara on 3/30/2007 05:56:00 PM :

       16 panel page



From the 1985 DC graphic novel adaptation of Robert Bloch's Hell on Earth. Art by Keith Giffen.

That's right, kids. 46 pages of 16 panel grids. Damn, I loves me some Giffen art.

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Wednesday, March 28, 2007
 
  Posted by Tony on 3/28/2007 05:14:00 PM :

       Oh, mercy sakes

You ever write something and you're just kind of disturbed that you had stuff like that in your head? Here's Page 2 from Monster Trucks and Baby Mammas, my collaboration with Craig for Panel 9 From Outer Space.



I need to send out proof copies and tighten up the lettering, but this is basically it.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2007
 
  Posted by Dara on 3/27/2007 10:44:00 PM :

       A heartwarming post about kids and comics

I wanted to share this little personal story because it simply warms my heart. It's about an 8 year old girl and a comic book series called Bone.

When Wendy and I first started dating, Hanna was 4 and, to my surprise, a big fan of Batman. This was due to the fact that a boy at her preschool that she had a crush on (and I mean that in the most innocent way possible, as only a 4 year old could) was huge into Batman. Of course, the presence of the exceptionally well done Batman and Justice League animated series (and their related licensed toys, clothes, lunch boxes, Happy Meal toys, etc.) meant there was an endless stream of comic book superhero merchandise to feed her interests.

As the years went by, her interest in these characters faded a bit, but never disappeared. Cartoons such as Teen Titans and even Danny Phantom still occupied a big part of her imagination.

And then she learned to read.

I'd pick her up kid friendly comics here and there, and she'd read them with great interest. Oddly enough, one of her favorites was Sean McKeever's Spider-man Loves Mary Jane series, which is aimed more towards tween and teens. But even with this series, she never asked for the latest issue, or got all excited when talking about it.

And then I gave her the first volume of the Scholastic color reprints of Bone.

I think the book sat around for a while before she started reading it. But once she did, there was no stopping her. She'd beg Wendy to let her stay up late just so she could finish a chapter. When she finished book 1, half an hour past her bedtime, she was disappointed when she was told no, she couldn't stay up any later to start book 2. "But mom, the way first book ended it's, like, a mystery and I need to know what happens next!" She reads it on the school bus, at latchkey, and before going to bed. And she gets excited when she discusses the book with me. She'll tell me what's happened with the bone cousins, she'll ask if I remember the first time the dragon appeared, and she'll want to know what's going to happen with the rat creatures' evil plan.

That is the power of a good book. The fact that it's a comic book, an independently created and published one, created by a guy right here in Columbus, makes it that much cooler to me. I can't wait to get her the remaining volumes, talk about the characters and events, and see that look of excitement and curiosity on her face.

A related story: at her birthday party this year, I let her friends pick out a free comic from a pile of kid friendly ones. One of the girls picked up the black & white first issue of Bone. Her dad has since told me that she's read the comic so many times that the cover is falling off and the staples are loose. He asked me where he could find the other issues, and I told him all about the collected editions, both the original black and white ones, and the new Scholastic color editions. Available not only at your friendly neighborhood comic book store, but at "legitimate" outlets like Barned & Noble and Amazon. Here's to more and more kids discovering the joy of comics.


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  Posted by Tony on 3/27/2007 04:16:00 PM :

       bad-ass pixie

It's not comix-related, but everybody should see this clip of Bjork beating up a TV reporter.

http://cityrag.blogs.com/main/2007/03/bjork_fight.html


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  Posted by Sean McGurr on 3/27/2007 04:13:00 PM :

       Another Comics Fan

Newsweek does an occasional feature called "A Life in Books" where an author or celebrity discusses his/hers "Five Most Important Books" and "An Important Book that you admit you haven't read." Not always insightful, but sometimes there is something that catches me off guard.

A few weeks ago I pointed out to Matt that the Librarian of Congress had a similar favorite as him. This week, Walter Mosley, author of a number of mysteries including Devil in a Blue Dress, as well as some thrillers and sci-fi, puts The Fantastic Four, Issues 1-100 among his favs saying "Jack Kirby's work with Stan Lee creates an image of my childhood which carried me into fiction."

I wouldn't have guessed based on the books that I read of his that FF was an influence, although I haven't read his sci-fi book.

Anyone else want to post a five important books and another you admit you haven't read. I'm going to take a shot at it and post next week.


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Monday, March 26, 2007
 
  Posted by Tom on 3/26/2007 08:54:00 PM :

      



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  Posted by Craig on 3/26/2007 01:32:00 PM :

       Way Back Machine

New arrival at home = no time to write a lengthy post. Here's a panel from Iron Man #44 instead:

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  Posted by Dara on 3/26/2007 07:45:00 AM :

       Monday Morning "Guess the Artist"

In honor of March Madness, here's a little something different for you guys. An ad for Spalding basketballs. Probably an easy one...



(click image to use the reboundize)

(previous weeks: 9/12/2005, 9/19/2005, 9/26/2005, 10/3/2005, 10/10/2005, 10/17/2005, 10/24/2005, 10/31/2005, 11/1/2005, 11/2/2005, 11/3/2005, 11/4/2005, 11/5/2005, 11/6/2005, 11/7/2005, 11/14/2005, 11/21/2005, 11/28/2005, 12/5/2005, 12/12/2005, 12/19/2005, 12/26/2005, 1/2/2006, 1/9/2006, 1/16/2006, 1/23/2006, 1/30/2006, 2/06/2006, 2/13/2006, 2/20/2006, 2/27/2006, 3/6/2006, 3/13/2006, 3/20/2006, 3/27/2006, 4/3/2006, 4/4/2006, 4/5/2006, 4/6/2006, 4/7/2006, 4/8/2006, 4/9/2006, 4/10/2006, 4/17/2006, 4/23/2006, 5/1/2006, 5/8/2006, 5/15/2006, 5/22/2006, 5/29/2006, 6/5/2006, 6/12/2006, 6/19/2006, 6/26/2006, 7/3/2006, 7/10/2006, 7/17/2006, 7/24/2006, 7/31/2006, 8/7/2006, 8/13/2006, 8/21/2006, 8/28/2006, 9/4/2006, 9/11/2006, 9/18/2006, 9/25/2006, 10/2/2006, 10/9/2006, 10/16/2006, 10/23/2006, 10/30/2006, 11/6/2006, 11/13/2006, 11/20/2006, 11/27/2006, 12/4/2006, 12/11/2006, 12/18/2006, 12/25/2006, 1/1/2007, 1/8/2007, 1/15/2007, 1/22/2007, 1/29/2007, 2/5/2007, 2/12/2007, 2/19/2007, 2/26/2007, 3/5/2007, 3/12/2007, 3/19/2007)

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Wednesday, March 21, 2007
 
  Posted by Dara on 3/21/2007 03:04:00 PM :

       Hey brother, can you spare a DVR?

Apparently today is "ask the Ferret for help day"...

PANELista Tony Going writes:
"Hey, folks. I was just interviewed on TV talking about a minor chemical spill in our parking lot. Was anyone injured? Did we evacuate school? Is my hair ridiculous on camera? You'll have to tune in between 5-6:30 p.m. to find out. All three networks were there.

Please - please - please -- somebody TiVo it!"
You heard the man, Columbus residents. Someone tape or DVR the local news so Tony can check out his mad oratory skillz.


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Tuesday, March 20, 2007
 
  Posted by Dara on 3/20/2007 11:02:00 PM :

       Hey buddy, can you spare a vote?

Friend of the ferret Chad Lambert writes:
"The Dayton Daily News does this caption contest with Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Mike Peters. They supply art with a blank balloon and wannabe writers submit their best stuff.

Long story short--I'm one of five finalists! The winner, chosen via online voting, gets published AND gets the original art of the winning cartoon!

The link to the finalists is here:

Open Mike

Mine is choice #3: "No, trans fats haven't been banned in Ohio yet. Why do you ask?"



So if you're so inclined, drop on by the website and vote for Chad's entry. I can honestly say that I like his entry the best out of the five, especially out of the two atrocious puns.


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Monday, March 19, 2007
 
  Posted by Dara on 3/19/2007 09:14:00 AM :

       Monday Morning "Guess the Artist"

Ok, it's a really tough one again this week. I'm digging way back into my back issue bins. Good luck!



(click image to use the jazzercize)

(previous weeks: 9/12/2005, 9/19/2005, 9/26/2005, 10/3/2005, 10/10/2005, 10/17/2005, 10/24/2005, 10/31/2005, 11/1/2005, 11/2/2005, 11/3/2005, 11/4/2005, 11/5/2005, 11/6/2005, 11/7/2005, 11/14/2005, 11/21/2005, 11/28/2005, 12/5/2005, 12/12/2005, 12/19/2005, 12/26/2005, 1/2/2006, 1/9/2006, 1/16/2006, 1/23/2006, 1/30/2006, 2/06/2006, 2/13/2006, 2/20/2006, 2/27/2006, 3/6/2006, 3/13/2006, 3/20/2006, 3/27/2006, 4/3/2006, 4/4/2006, 4/5/2006, 4/6/2006, 4/7/2006, 4/8/2006, 4/9/2006, 4/10/2006, 4/17/2006, 4/23/2006, 5/1/2006, 5/8/2006, 5/15/2006, 5/22/2006, 5/29/2006, 6/5/2006, 6/12/2006, 6/19/2006, 6/26/2006, 7/3/2006, 7/10/2006, 7/17/2006, 7/24/2006, 7/31/2006, 8/7/2006, 8/13/2006, 8/21/2006, 8/28/2006, 9/4/2006, 9/11/2006, 9/18/2006, 9/25/2006, 10/2/2006, 10/9/2006, 10/16/2006, 10/23/2006, 10/30/2006, 11/6/2006, 11/13/2006, 11/20/2006, 11/27/2006, 12/4/2006, 12/11/2006, 12/18/2006, 12/25/2006, 1/1/2007, 1/8/2007, 1/15/2007, 1/22/2007, 1/29/2007, 2/5/2007, 2/12/2007, 2/19/2007, 2/26/2007, 3/5/2007, 3/12/2007)

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Friday, March 16, 2007
 
  Posted by Sean McGurr on 3/16/2007 08:25:00 AM :

       More McSweeney's Goodness

I haven't laughed this hard for a while. From "The Personal Journal of Zan, the Male Half of the Wonder Twins." by Sean Hewlett published on McSweeney's today:

January 27
Pulled off greatest prank ever today. At the mayor's ceremony
awarding the Super Friends the key to the city, took the form of a big fucking
wet spot on the crotch of the Flash's tights as he addressed the crowd. Guess he
found out there are more embarrassing things than getting made fun of for
wearing purple tights in front of a bunch of grade-school kids, huh?

There are plenty more good ones. Check it out.

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Thursday, March 15, 2007
 
  Posted by Tony on 3/15/2007 03:31:00 PM :

       not in my ghetto

Here's something that shouldn't bother me, but still kind of does: Non-comics bloggers talking about comics.

Case in point: Pajiba.com's Seth Freilich usually writes about television, but this week he decided to devote 9,000 words to his favorite comics. I'm sorry, but it's exactly the list you'd pull off the top of your head.

Watchmen, Invisibles, Y: The Last Man, Bone, Fables, Understanding Comics, Sandman and Maus. The only one I'm not familiar with is Beautiful Stories for Ugly Children.

I can't quite tell you why this irritates me. I feel like, if you step into my ghetto, you ought to be able to recite more than the greatest hits.

I need to get over this. In the comments, several people mention a lot of other books. A few people pledge to pick up some really good stuff. I guess I should be happy at any opportunity to bring in new readers to our little ghetto.


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Wednesday, March 14, 2007
 
  Posted by Tony on 3/14/2007 09:16:00 AM :

       Female Trouble



Court TV has a show about married couples who kill each other, with John Waters playing the part of a Crypt-Keeper-like narrator called the Groom Reaper. It's called, naturally, "'Til Death Do Us Part."

That would be interesting enough, but then they go and promote it with a webcomic.

Can anyone identify the artist?



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Tuesday, March 13, 2007
 
  Posted by Craig on 3/13/2007 04:20:00 PM :

       Way Back Machine

Marvel Team Up #15

Andy recently lumped the Ghost Rider onto a list of least favorite characters next to Moon Knight when responding to a previous post. While I have nothing but the utmost respect for Andy, it makes me sad on this occasion to see him so terribly, terribly wrong.

Non-comic readers attending multiplexes all across America are becoming acquainted with Ghost Rider in a form consistent with the portrayal that made the character hugely successful in the dark days of the 90’s: “Satan’s bounty hunter” or a leather-jacketed “spirit of vengeance”, armed with the eerie “penance stare” to wither the souls of his enemies and bring the grim n’ gritty to another mylar bag in your long box.

This Ghost Rider is, of course, pure bullshit.

The Ghost Rider I first encountered in the pages of a Marvel Team-Up from 1973 was not simply a Punisher-retread as later depicted. Garbed in a Vegas showman’s jumpsuit and performing circus stunts in his civilian identity, Johnny Blaze didn’t seek out the guilty to deliver judgment; rather, he fought his alter ego in the same fashion as Bruce Banner, giving in to the need to release his inner demon when pursued by the minions of hell and other weirdoes and goofballs. Unlike Dr. Banner, Blaze was frequently able to bend the demon to his will, and some mean trick cycling augmented his array of supernatural powers. It was far more entertaining to read about than the simpleminded revenge fantasy of later interpretations.

Len Wein wrote the first meeting of these two characters, and Ross Andru pencilled the story. Ross was the guy who introduced me to Spider-Man, and his visual style remains the definitive look for the character for me. This issue of Marvel Team-Up appeared at about the same time as Andru was beginning his fifty-odd issue run on Amazing Spider-Man; the artwork appears slightly less developed than the later issues I remember so fondly, but the flavor is definitely there.

I think you guys are going to have to sit through a Ross Andru post somewhere down the line.

But back to our story: The father of Ghost Rider’s girlfriend once had an uneasy partnership in the circus business with Drake Shannon. When their feud came to a head, they staged a race to determine who would be the sole owner of the show. Shannon tried to cheat and lost—spectacularly—but has returned to reclaim ownership of the show he believes is rightfully his from his former partner’s daughter. Only he’s not Drake Shannon anymore—he’s The Orb!

The Orb has a proud spot on my list of all-time favorite goofball villains. While some evildoers get their start through nuclear accidents, others through genetic experiments, still others through supernatural avenues, the origin of The Orb stands unique among Marvel’s hall of infamy:

He decided to become a bad guy after a motorcycle accident in which he skidded over 25 yards of pavement ON HIS FACE!

There are some characters that might spend their careers battling the Road Runner with an origin like this, but not The Orb; he sets his sights much higher and goes gunning for two superheroes in his debut appearance. He’s a mean trick cyclist himself, and also comes armed with a hypno-helmet. He ends his origin story by giving Roxanne Simpson and the reader the payoff that Doctor Doom has never delivered: a close-up of that hideously scarred mug. Young Craig had nightmares about these panels.

Of course, our heroes thwart The Orb’s evil plans, leading to the obvious, thrilling conclusion: a motorcycle chase to the finish! Even Spider-Man, with all his vaunted arachnid powers, realizes that this situation calls for some mean trick cycling, Spidey-style!

The Orb makes an unwise choice to try to escape by riding down a subway tunnel (if only Spider-Man had just painted it on the wall!), riding right into the path of an oncoming train. Ghost Rider searches in vain for the body, and we are left to wonder… will we ever see this arch-villain again?

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  Posted by Dara on 3/13/2007 08:20:00 AM :

       Man steals $28 million from Antwerp bank

Writers, here's a real news story that can serve as a springboard for a fictional crime tale:
"More than half the world's diamonds are traded in Antwerp's gem district, a maze of tiny streets hugging the main train station. Its turnover of $23 billion a year makes it one of the densest concentrations of valuables on earth."

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Monday, March 12, 2007
 
  Posted by Tony on 3/12/2007 05:10:00 PM :

       It's like they're reading my mind ...






Dual Pistols
You preferred a weapon with 21% power over speed and 69% range over melee.
You use Dual Pistols.

Best done with relatively light pistols like Berettas, a pair of pistols is the quintessential Street Samurai's arsenal. Stylish and fast, a pair of pistols is inaccurate but fearsome. You excel at providing cover fire and look cool while doing it. Your opponents will dive for cover when you reach to your sides.





My test tracked 2 variables How you compared to other people your age and gender:












free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 4% on power





free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 80% on range
Link: The What's Your Signature Weapon Test


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  Posted by Tony on 3/12/2007 12:19:00 PM :

       lookee thar


I was looking at wonkette.com this morning, and one of the ads caught my eye. It was the same bus stop that I used to drive past every morning! Turns out it was for the Web site of a local artist who photographs signs. Sometimes he alters them in PhotoShop.

This one I can vouch for; this is exactly how it looked at the corner of 4th and Spring this fall. You can see the big Chase Bank banner ad in the background.

www.vinchen.com


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  Posted by Dara on 3/12/2007 08:40:00 AM :

       Monday Morning "Guess the Artist"

I suspect this one will be a tough one to guess, but you guys always find ways to surprise me...



(click image to use the sepiatonerize)

(previous weeks: 9/12/2005, 9/19/2005, 9/26/2005, 10/3/2005, 10/10/2005, 10/17/2005, 10/24/2005, 10/31/2005, 11/1/2005, 11/2/2005, 11/3/2005, 11/4/2005, 11/5/2005, 11/6/2005, 11/7/2005, 11/14/2005, 11/21/2005, 11/28/2005, 12/5/2005, 12/12/2005, 12/19/2005, 12/26/2005, 1/2/2006, 1/9/2006, 1/16/2006, 1/23/2006, 1/30/2006, 2/06/2006, 2/13/2006, 2/20/2006, 2/27/2006, 3/6/2006, 3/13/2006, 3/20/2006, 3/27/2006, 4/3/2006, 4/4/2006, 4/5/2006, 4/6/2006, 4/7/2006, 4/8/2006, 4/9/2006, 4/10/2006, 4/17/2006, 4/23/2006, 5/1/2006, 5/8/2006, 5/15/2006, 5/22/2006, 5/29/2006, 6/5/2006, 6/12/2006, 6/19/2006, 6/26/2006, 7/3/2006, 7/10/2006, 7/17/2006, 7/24/2006, 7/31/2006, 8/7/2006, 8/13/2006, 8/21/2006, 8/28/2006, 9/4/2006, 9/11/2006, 9/18/2006, 9/25/2006, 10/2/2006, 10/9/2006, 10/16/2006, 10/23/2006, 10/30/2006, 11/6/2006, 11/13/2006, 11/20/2006, 11/27/2006, 12/4/2006, 12/11/2006, 12/18/2006, 12/25/2006, 1/1/2007, 1/8/2007, 1/15/2007, 1/22/2007, 1/29/2007, 2/5/2007, 2/12/2007, 2/19/2007, 2/26/2007, 3/5/2007)

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Friday, March 09, 2007
 
  Posted by Tony on 3/09/2007 03:21:00 PM :

       Something I like


I feel bad saying so in such an indie-friendly crowd, but one of my favorite books right now is DC Comics' "52."

52 is everything your average Big Two event is not. It requires no crossovers; it is its own crossover. It has no stars -- Batman and Wonder Woman have appeared only once each, and the biggest name among the recurring characters is probably Steel. And not only is it not late, it comes out monthly.

Issue 42 wrapped up the Ralph Dibny storyline, and it's one of the strongest so far. The resolution took me completely by surprise, but makes perfect sense in hindsight. And it plays with concepts of life and death, salvation and damnation. Superhero comics are at their best when they take on the big themes, use amazing powers, and throw in something surprising.

Most amazingly, it made me really care about Ralph Dibny, the Elongated Man. He was wasted in Starman, and I'd always thought of him as the poor man's Plastic Man. This makes me wish I'd gotten to know him better.

52 is good, solid four-color adventure. I'll be back next year for the sequel, "Countdown," which will feature our friend Sean McKeever.


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Thursday, March 08, 2007
 
  Posted by Tony on 3/08/2007 12:04:00 PM :

       inadequacy

Just when I'm already feeling bad about not blogging so much, I see that our friend Caleb Mozzocco has put up a 4,903-word post on Plastic Man, complete with about two dozen pictures.

That's dedication.


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Tuesday, March 06, 2007
 
  Posted by Tony on 3/06/2007 10:59:00 AM :

       The Truth is Out There

Dara's mention of the X-Files reminds me ... I used to love that show.

I mean, really love it. I used to have Mulder and Scully action figures. I saw "Playing By Heart," which co-stars Gillian Anderson. And I have about a dozen episodes on VHS at home.

But God help me, I can't bring myself to watch any of them. I skip it if I see it in reruns. I can't for the life of me remember how the overall arc turned out. I'm so over that show, we need a new word for "over."

A quick look at the X-Files page on Jumptheshark.com shows that a large percentage of visitors think that show never "jumped the shark." 472 voters vote for "never jumped," 254 say it jumped after the Movie, and 205 say it jumped after Mulder left.

Personally, I think it got bad when Mulder left, but it jumped for good when he came back. Does anyone else remember the episodes where Mulder had cancer or something, and then found out the Cancer Man was his father, and then they had him strung up on some kind of cross thing?

At that point, I was done with David Duchovny and his ego. I was just settling in to see some workmanlike Gillian Anderson/Robert Patrick work, and the Mulder kept showing up out of the blue. Are we telling a story here, or working around this guy's golf schedule?

That was it for me, man. It was time to get into Buffy.


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Monday, March 05, 2007
 
  Posted by Dara on 3/05/2007 09:38:00 PM :

       Tonight's Heroes

FBI agents Quesada and Alonso.

Cute, but kinda tacky.

I mean, if you're gonna' make sly comic book creator references, go with the real deal. Kirby. Ditko. Toth. Siegel. Lee. etc.

On the other hand, they did end up on the wrong end of a gun, so maybe it's all for the best.

Great episode otherwise. Another couple of unexpected twists. Wow.


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  Posted by Dara on 3/05/2007 08:14:00 PM :

       Spot-on analysis of Lost

I meant to post this earlier, but forgot. In his column a couple of weeks ago, Steven Grant lead with this bit of news about my (formerly) favorite show of all time, Lost:
"Word came down last week that ABC's former hit series, LOST (Wed 10P), one of the handful of shows credited with turning the network's fortunes around a few years back, is in trouble. Seems viewership, already down this year, dropped off badly for the return episode two weeks ago - it was supposed to be calculated to bring everyone up to date and jumpstart interest, and generally got good reviews from TV critics - and lost about a quarter of that audience by last week, prompting open if unofficial suggestions from ABC that all mysteries might be wrapped up by season's end, with the implication it could also be the series end as well if things don't start looking up."
He then goes on to lay out this concise analysis of what's been turning fans off about the show:
"Too many storylines, too many questions, too few resolutions."
That, in a nutshell, is why I've become quite disillusioned with the show as well. Don't get me wrong, I don't want to pan the show because it's still light years beyond the majority of the crap on TV. The creators deserve a lot of credit for concocting an amazingly intricate and fascinating mystery, a fantastic cast of multicultural characters with rich back stories, and just really solid, skillful writing. But the show has become a victim of its own success. In order to keep it on the air for years to come, they've fallen into the The X-Files trap of stretching out the main storyline infinitely, constantly introducing new plot elements, but never answering any of their audience's questions.
"Structurally, here's the problem with stories like LOST. It's what I call the "Master Of Kung Fu" concept: catch or kill Fu Manchu, and the series' reason to exist ends. Don't catch or kill Fu Manchu, and the protagonists ultimately come across as impotent, whatever minor victories they might achieve. "
If the ratings drop really is accurate, and there's any truth to the rumors that the show might be winding up by the end of this season or the next, then I'd welcome that as real good news for the fans. Because frankly, I'd rather have a planned exit, tying up all the loose ends and bringing the story to its intended conclusion, than an unceremonious cancellation or worse yet, a painful decline into irrelevance, a la The X-Files.

By the way, Steven also writes a bit about the "parabolic arc" nature of a story, using Thomas Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow as an effective analogy. Good stuff, especially for you writer types.

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  Posted by Dara on 3/05/2007 08:09:00 PM :

       Writers: Moonstone looking for your pitches

Saw this on The Pulse, thought I'd share with everyone. Moonstone will be publishing comics based on the old Captain Action line of toys (and a DC comics series) from the 60s.
"Moonstone wants to give CAP his due in comics!

We're looking for proposals of no more than two pages.

The premise is entirely up to you!

Create a NEW "back story" as well as set CAP on a course for new adventures! We're looking for that one GREAT IDEA, and we know it's out there! (Please remember that CAP is a licensed property, and as such, if approved, would be considered "work for hire".)

All proposals will be subject to review. You can e-mail proposals to contact_us@moonstonebooks.com"
Not much info there, to be sure. But what the heck, give it a shot if you're up for it.

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  Posted by Tom on 3/05/2007 07:37:00 PM :

       Wise Mr. Vado

Dan Vado is a fountain of depression about the industry. But sooo true. The bit about where he'd not do it all over again is the most stinging statment. I'd seriously like to check in on the viability of downloadable comics. Not like webcomics but more highend. Check out his eyemelt setup. But alot of the 'kids' don't seem to care and torrent their comics.


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  Posted by Dara on 3/05/2007 07:35:00 AM :

       Monday Morning "Guess the Artist"

Well guys, now you've done it. You guessed all the other pages so easily, I'm forced to pull out the big guns. Hopefully this page will be more of a challenge.

As always, if you have the comic book this came from, please recuse yourself from the game.



(click image to use the mouthsize)

(previous weeks: 9/12/2005, 9/19/2005, 9/26/2005, 10/3/2005, 10/10/2005, 10/17/2005, 10/24/2005, 10/31/2005, 11/1/2005, 11/2/2005, 11/3/2005, 11/4/2005, 11/5/2005, 11/6/2005, 11/7/2005, 11/14/2005, 11/21/2005, 11/28/2005, 12/5/2005, 12/12/2005, 12/19/2005, 12/26/2005, 1/2/2006, 1/9/2006, 1/16/2006, 1/23/2006, 1/30/2006, 2/06/2006, 2/13/2006, 2/20/2006, 2/27/2006, 3/6/2006, 3/13/2006, 3/20/2006, 3/27/2006, 4/3/2006, 4/4/2006, 4/5/2006, 4/6/2006, 4/7/2006, 4/8/2006, 4/9/2006, 4/10/2006, 4/17/2006, 4/23/2006, 5/1/2006, 5/8/2006, 5/15/2006, 5/22/2006, 5/29/2006, 6/5/2006, 6/12/2006, 6/19/2006, 6/26/2006, 7/3/2006, 7/10/2006, 7/17/2006, 7/24/2006, 7/31/2006, 8/7/2006, 8/13/2006, 8/21/2006, 8/28/2006, 9/4/2006, 9/11/2006, 9/18/2006, 9/25/2006, 10/2/2006, 10/9/2006, 10/16/2006, 10/23/2006, 10/30/2006, 11/6/2006, 11/13/2006, 11/20/2006, 11/27/2006, 12/4/2006, 12/11/2006, 12/18/2006, 12/25/2006, 1/1/2007, 1/8/2007, 1/15/2007, 1/22/2007, 1/29/2007, 2/5/2007, 2/12/2007, 2/19/2007, 2/26/2007)

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Saturday, March 03, 2007
 
  Posted by Dara on 3/03/2007 01:10:00 PM :

       Columbus restaurant looking for artists

Via Wendy, comes this call for artists, as posted on Craig's List:
"Hello everyone!

Pesto is looking for artists to showcase in a rotating series called 21 DAYS.

Every 3 weeks, we will display 7 pieces of wall-mountable artwork by a local artist. We are particularly interested in college students, but any and all Columbus artists are encouraged to submit their portfolios for consideration. The decisions to sell and broker the artwork are SOLELY the artist's responsibility, but Pesto will provide the wall space at no charge to the artist. If artwork is sold, Pesto will NOT charge any type of commission/fee. This is our gift to our community and we are excited to provide an opportunity for local art to have an audience.

21 Days will begin soon. All interested applicants should choose their 7 submissions and contact us for more information.

Thanks!"
If interested, answer via the e-maill address on the listing, or just call Pesto.

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Thursday, March 01, 2007
 
  Posted by Dara on 3/01/2007 10:11:00 PM :

       Say hello to Brainbot, Jr.

This month marks the debut of Brainbot, Jr., the new comic strip by yours truly and Tom Williams. Brainbot will appear once a month in the pages of Columbus' own little music and entertainment magazine, Melt. In addition, we plan on featuring bonus strips, original art, and other surprises on the new Brainbot, Jr. website.



Go grab yourself a copy. Or check us out online.



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